4 Life Lessons Every Man Can Learn From American Psycho

No, we're not going to teach you how to get a reservation at Dorsia.
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A few things to preface this piece. No, we at Boss Hunting do not condone substance abuse, misogyny, socio/psychopathy, and definitely not the murder of colleagues to Huey Lewis. Or the homeless... or models. Murder of anyone, really, is a no no, even if that person happens to be Jared Leto. It seems like an obvious statement, but we're just waiting for all you reasonable people out there to say something undoubtedly reasonable in the comment section. But I digress. There are actually lessons to be extrapolated from Patrick Bateman and co. in the cult classic, American Psycho. Some of which can be utilised by you, the modern man. You know the old saying, 'there's always some truth in satire'.

Competition is healthy.

We live in an era where participation trophies are handed out freely, and keeping score is discouraged for fear of hurt feelings. This is regressive. Competition, whether it be in the most beautifully formatted business card, or the primest slice of New York real estate, is what keeps us on our toes. It's what lead our species to stand here today. It forces us to become the best version of ourselves in a pursuit to lead the rat race. By all means, you should only look at your neighbour's bowl to make sure they have enough, but a kick in the ass towards the right direction never really did any harm.

Know when to pull back from an obsession.

To clarify, there are two types of obsession: a) The kind which motivates us to do 1000 crunches a day, take care of our skin, and function the most efficiently we can, and b) the kind that drives us to hatchet someone in the face for getting a dinner reservation we could not, only to return to an apartment we couldn't afford. Stick with the former and you might see some results. Go with the latter and the law might catch up to you. Bret Easton Ellis doesn't write our reality, after all.

Conformity's for suckers, you do you.

Sure, you could be another slick haircut in a bespoke Valentine Couture suit and Oliver Peoples glasses, or you could be your own person. Define your own style. Don't give people the chance to forget you or confuse you for someone else. And live on an engine fuelled by your own ethos. Full disclosure, it'd be pretty awesome to be in a bespoke Valentine Couture suit and Oliver Peoples glasses, but if everyone's on that level, where's the fun in that?

If you're not planning ahead, you're planning to fail.

Again, I cannot stress how anti-serial killing we are, but the key lesson here is marked by the moment Patrick Bateman acts on impulse and emotion. From there it's a slippery slope. Impulse and emotion as opposed to thorough thought, and he's almost (almost) foiled amidst his gory spree. Once more for the people in the back, with some things, planning is key to the opposite of failure. Go over every detail, every contingency scenario, the contingency scenarios to those contingency scenarios-- rinse and repeat. You get the point.