How Much Prize Money Will The Super Bowl LVI Winners Take Home?

Super Bowl LVI 2022 Prize Money Winners Losers

The Los Angeles Rams won’t just be taking home the coveted Vince Lombardi Trophy along with a shiny new ring valued at approximately US$36,500 / AU$51,250 after their 23-20 victory against the Cincinnati Bengals. Securing the franchise’s first title in over two decades at Super Bowl LVI has also earned the 2022 NFL champions a good amount of prize money.

Super Bowl LVI Prize Money Breakdown [2022]

According to the NFL’s Collective Bargaining Agreement, in addition to each player’s salary, bonus incentives, and so forth outlined in their respective contracts, eligible members of the winning team will receive US$150,000 / AU$210,600 – that’s US$20,000 / AU$28,000 more than what the Kansas City Chiefs earned at Super Bowl LIV. And keep in mind… this is on top of all the financial extras they unlocked for their playoff wins (which the Bengals also unlocked leading up to the big dance):

  • Wild card – US$42,500 / AU$60,000
  • Divisional – US$42,500 / AU$50,000
  • Conference championship – US$65,000 / AU$91,000
    Total: US$150,000 / AU$210,600

But the Rams won’t be the only ones getting paid with a capital P.



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Eligible members of the losing team are also entitled to US$75,000 / AU$105,300 for their Super Bowl appearance (half the amount of the champions) – that’s US$10,000 / AU$14,000 more than what the San Francisco 49ers earned at Super Bowl LIV and US$16,000 / AU$22,500 more than what the Rams earned when they lost to the New England Patriots circa 2019. Granted, it doesn’t quite compare to being crowned the kings of NFL with all the bling + bragging rights that comes attached. Although it’d certainly help soothe the sting of defeat for Joe Burrows & Co.

“The amount of [prize] money that Super Bowl winners get has increased steadily since the very first time the event was held in 1967 when winners received $15,000 each and the losers walked away with $7,500,” writes Nicolas Vega of CNBC.

“This year’s numbers may seem huge in comparison – but when adjusted for inflation, the 1967 winners’ prize is equivalent to more than $128,000 in today’s dollars, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ inflation calculator.”

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“That’s a relatively recent development: it took decades for the Super Bowl prize money to catch up to the rate of inflation. The purses stayed constant from 1967 until 1978, when the bonus for winners increased to $18,000, while the losers received $9,000.”



“The prize money topped $50,000 for the first time in 1999, with the winning players each receiving a $53,000 bonus and the losers each getting $32,500. It wasn’t until Super Bowl 50 in 2016 that the winners’ bonus finally surpassed $100,000, with the champion Denver Broncos taking home $103,000 per player, and the losing Carolina Panthers each receiving $51,000.”

Notice how we specifically used the term “eligible” as opposed to “every”? That’s because there is in fact a minimum criteria players have to meet. Showing up and riding the pine simply won’t do. Depending on how many boxes an individual from the footballing elite can tick, they’ll pocket the full bonus or a half bonus.

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Super Bowl LVI Prize Money Criteria (Full Bonus)

  • Player was on the team’s active or inactive list when the Super Bowl is played; have been on the roster for at least three previous games (regular season or playoffs)
  • Player was not on the team’s active or inactive list when the Super Bowl is played, but have been on the roster for at least eight previous games (regular season or playoffs)
  • Veteran players who were injured during the regular season and removed from the team’s active or inactive list (provided they are still under contract when the Super Bowl is played)

Super Bowl LVI Prize Money Criteria (Half Bonus)

  • Player was on the team’s active or inactive list when the Super Bowl is played; have been on the roster for less than three previous games (regular season or playoffs)
  • Player was not on the team’s active or inactive list when the Super Bowl is played, but have been on the roster for at least three and not more than seven previous games (regular season or playoffs)
  • First-year players who were injured during the regular season and removed from the team’s active or inactive list (provided they are still under contract when the Super Bowl is played)